Therapeutic Massage in 3 simple steps

Massage therapy may be something your doctor recommended you try for relieving muscle pain, stiffness or stress.

Perhaps you received a gift certificate but have never had a professional massage.

You might think it a waste of time and money. But even frugal fans know it’s worth every penny.

Consider these three simple steps to maximize the health benefits of your next massage:

1. Talk to your massage therapist enough to tell them about any concerns or problem areas. Do you want to have those muscles worked on and feel that ‘good pain’ or do you really just need to relax and de-stress? Both types of massage are beneficial, but be clear with your Registered Massage Therapist so you get what you expect. Then opt to chat less and focus on relaxing your body more. It’s the perfect time to still your mind.

2. Set the stage for yourself. Ask your massage therapist to adjust anything that’s not helping you get into your cozy zone. It’s your time, so let’s be sure to have the music and lighting just right and the temperature perfect for you. You don’t need to be shy about your body, as your RMT is trained in sheet-draping techniques to protect your modesty.

3. Now practice relaxing and listening to your body. Be aware of how your muscles feel when massaged: is there good pain, bad pain or no pain? You may be surprised that your muscles engage or tense up, but you and your RMT will soon learn what pressure is appropriate for you. The more you can relax and not tense up, the better you’ll receive the therapy. Take some deep breaths to distract your mind from any pain. Don’t worry, your body will soon learn to remember to relax and it’ll get easier the more you practice!

Try these three simple steps next time you slip between the sheets. You’ll soon be a professional yourself at relaxing your mind and body.

What’s Your Problem?

Many people think that their problem is the pain they feel. In fact many of us will go on ignoring our pain until that pain finally interferes with something we need or love and we finally take action on it.

But pain itself is not the problem. Pain is not a condition to be treated, although I just had a patient start in the office “diagnosed” with chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain is not a condition, no pain is a condition, it is merely a symptom. It is a signal.

Just like the sound of your smoke detector is not a problem, it is a signal. If you turn off the smoke detector you have not solved anything all you did was turn off the signal.

Symptoms are not the first thing to show up when something is malfunctioning. Pain shows up when we exceed our are ability to adapt to the malfunction.

So when someone presents to our office in pain, we understand that you have hit your limit and it is impacting your ability to live your best life but we don’t want to focus on it.

Our goal is not to get rid of your pain. We don’t want to turn off your signal, numb your body, or say to your feedback system that we don’t care what you are telling us. What we want to do is respect that pain for what it is. Your body’s alarm system that something is malfunctioning.

From there we want to move forward and restore normal function to the body and help you understand the basic fundamentals you need to live your best life.